Brexit and People Like Us (PLU)

 

For anyone still interested in why the British public voted for Brexit, the extract below from the Financial Times last year in a letter from Mr Keith Craig, London SW7, perfectly encapsulates a complex set of circumstances into a pithy and succinct explanation.  You would be hard pressed to find anything better.

Many would say that the FT should print this letter every day or at least every week and move it to the front not the back pages as a reminder to journalists as well as FT readers of the arrogance of the elite.  Nonetheless, fair dues to the FT for printing it as it does not reflect well on them or their readership.  Whether you agree or disagree with the sentiment, it is at least thought-provoking but also bear in mind the FT’s purpose is not necessarily to represent the views of the British public, rather the views and aspirations of big business and the global corporates and their drive for ever greater profits.

“Face it.  PLU blew it for everyone but themselves

Sir, Your pages overflow with predictions of disaster brought on by the Brexit/Trump axis.  Leaving aside the depressing and repetitive pointlessness of this mass guesswork, its underlying assumption – that things were better when People Like Us were in charge – is at best dubious, at worst delusional.  Under PLU rule, we have two failed wars and the Middle East in flames, China expansionist, Europe enfeebled, America ineffective and Russia resurgent.  At home, we have banking crises, stagnant median incomes, uncontrolled borders, record indebtedness, profiteering by the “professional” classes, and general social polarisation,.  This is the Eden from which the rude and licentious electorates have expelled us?

Face it.  We FT readers had our decades in charge and we blew it for everyone but us.  Time for us to do what we’ve been telling the rest of them to do for years, and suck it up. Or go forth and earn the respect that regains power. “

Several months on, has the printing of this letter resulted in a whiff of humility in the FT editorials, not that I can see and no, I’m not holding my breadth either.

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s